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View Comments (3) 13. Settlement Sections

179. The following sections provide an explanation of the implications of the 9 alternative growth Options (set out at paras 52-69). The amount of housing proposed for the settlement under each of 9 options is compared. Then the potential benefits and issues that may result from the Options at the settlement level are outlined in table format.

180. The settlement sections are provided to enable anyone with an interest in a particular settlement to understand the effects of the different options for that settlement in more detail. The substance of the information on the options, is the same as that presented in the earlier topic based chapters. Each of the sustainable settlements in the District (as identified in the settlement hierarchy at section 4) is addressed, either individually or in groups, as follows:

View Comments (1) Scraptoft, Thurnby and Bushby

181. Scraptoft, Thurnby and Bushby are settlements on the eastern edge of the Leicester urban area. Both have an historic core which has Conservation Area status. An area of green wedge lies to the north and west of Scraptoft separating it from Leicester and a separation area lies to the south of the main village protecting it from coalescence with Thurnby and Bushby to the south. Scraptoft has prepared a neighbourhood plan and this is currently undergoing examination. Thurnby and Bushby lies to the south of Scraptoft. An extensive green wedge stretching from Stoughton wraps round the south and west of Thurnby giving separation from the wider Leicester urban area.

View Comments (1) Housing

182.The number of households in Scraptoft, Thurnby and Bushby increased from 1,807 to 2,051 between 2001-2011 (ONS, Census). As of 31st March 2015 total completions 2011-2015 and outstanding planning approvals (commitments) stood at 761 dwellings. Once these completions and commitments are taken into account, the 9 options result in a remaining housing requirement for Scraptoft, Thurnby and Bushby ranging from 0 - 1,182 dwellings. The options around the upper end of the range take into account the submission of a possible strategic development area to the east of Scraptoft, the viability of which is still being assessed. The draft Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (July 2015) has identified potential housing land for 1,149 dwellings (excluding the potential strategic development area).

183. The chart below shows the potential housing requirement to 2031 under each distribution option and the table outlines the potential impacts of the options on Scraptoft, Thurnby and Bushby.

HDO: Scraptoft, Thurnby & Bushby

Option 1: RURAL

Option 2: CORE STRATEGY DISTRIBUTION

Option 3: URBAN

Option 4: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA

Option 5: KIBWORTH SDA

Option 6: LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 7: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

Option 8: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 9: LUTTERWORTH SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

166

303

478

1182

158

73

1046

1000

0

Option/s

What does this mean for Scraptoft, Thurnby and Bushby

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

4, 7, 8

Development of 1,000 dwellings and supporting infrastructure in a strategic development area to the east of Scraptoft.

  • Relief road linking Uppingham Road (A47) with Scraptoft Lane
  • Scale of development will allow delivery of supporting infrastructure (i.e. primary school, local centre, parkland etc)
  • Relief road may reduce traffic pressures on Station Lane and A47 / Station Road junction, yet to be fully assessed
  • Proposed Country Park could provide access to the countryside and maintain some separation between Scraptoft and Thurnby and Bushby
  • Reduce pressure for development on sensitive landscape to the south of the A47 and on the Leicester / Scraptoft Green Wedges and Thurnby / Leicester / Oadby Green Wedge
  • Northern part of site falls within the Separation Area between Scraptoft village and development adjacent to Thurnby and Bushby to the south
  • Impact on Separation Area yet to be assessed
  • Local landscape impact
  • Viability of the strategic development area as yet unproven
  • Capacity of local services and facilities (health, etc.)
  • Impacts on the A47
  • Small portion of southern part of the site is high grade agricultural land

2, 3

Options would involve a moderate amount of additional development focused on Scraptoft, Thurnby and Bushby to 2031. Potential key allocation needed:

Land east of Scraptoft (part of the potential SDA).

  • Potential allocation may deliver some infrastructure
  • Potentially less impact than Options 4,7,8 on Separation Area between Scraptoft and land adj to development in Thurnby and Bushby
  • Housing spread over a number of sites reducing risk of non delivery
  • Potential developer contributions towards improving capacity in local services and facilities
  • Potential for some impact on Separation Area
  • Relief-road not delivered and benefits not realised
  • Incremental impact on services and facilities (e.g. education) may not deliver major new infrastructure (e.g. primary school)

1, 5, 6

Relatively low amount of additional development to the settlements. Likely to be dealt with through gradual growth without the need for key allocations.

  • More gradual growth
  • Meets local housing needs
  • Maintains local character
  • Minimal impact on Separation Area or Green Wedges
  • Relief-road not delivered and benefits not realised

9

Effectively no need to develop further housing at Scraptoft, Thurnby and Bushby in addition to that already planned.

  • Maintains local character
  • No impact on Separation Area or Green Wedges
  • Relief-road not delivered and benefits not realised
  • No developer contributions

No Comments Employment

184. There are no outstanding employment commitments for Scraptoft, Thurnby and Bushby.

185. No employment provision is currently proposed within the potential Scraptoft / Thurnby SDA, as put forward through the recent Call for Sites. No employment areas for retention and protection have been identified.

No Comments Market Harborough

186. Market Harborough is the largest settlement in the District with a population of 21,894 in 2011 (Census 2011). It is the District's only sub-regional centre and has an extensive range of services, facilities, shops, employment and public transport choices, including a regular train service to Leicester and London. Although the town has grown significantly over the past 15 years, it remains essentially a market town in character and feel. The main shopping area is focused on the conservation area adding to its attraction and atmosphere.

View Comments (3) Housing

187. The number of households in Market Harborough increased from 8,039 to 9,374 between 2001-2011 (ONS, Census). As of 31st March 2015 total completions 2011-2015 and outstanding planning approvals (commitments) stood at 2,658 dwellings. Once these completions and commitments are taken into account, the 9 options result in a remaining housing requirement for Market Harborough ranging from 0 - 1,983 dwellings. The options around the upper end are based on the current strategy of focussing development in Market Harborough and other urban areas of the District. The options resulting in least development for the town are those which deliver a Lutterworth SDA or 2 SDAs. The draft Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (July 2015) has identified potential housing land for 1,893 dwellings in and adjacent to the town.

188. The chart below shows the number of homes which would need to be delivered by 2031 under each distribution option and the table outlines the potential impacts of the options on Market Harborough.

Market Harborough

Option 1:
RURAL

Option 2:
CORE STRATEGY DISTRIBUTION

Option 3:
URBAN

Option 4:
SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA

Option 5: KIBWORTH SDA

Option 6: LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 7: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

Option 8: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 9: LUTTERWORTH SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

807

1329

1983

866

775

440

333

52

0

Option/s

What does this mean for Market Harborough

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

2, 3

These options see relatively high growth across SHLAA sites in and adjacent to the town. Delivery of these options would need the potential allocation of the following key sites:

  • Land at Overstone Park
  • West of Farndon Fields
  • East of Blackberry Grange
  • Scale of potential key sites will allow for delivery of some supporting infrastructure / developer contributions towards existing services and facilities
  • Housing spread over a number of sites reducing risk of non delivery
  • Developments on edge of town relatively remote from existing services and facilities
  • Impact on local traffic not yet assessed in detail
  • Additional pressure on existing services and facilities
  • Most of the capacity on current SHLAA sites in and adjacent to the town would be needed, leaving little for future growth beyond 2031

1, 4, 5,

Options would involve a moderate amount of additional development focused on the town to 2031. Delivery likely to be through identification of appropriate key allocation:

  • Land at Overstone Park
  • Scale of potential key site will allow for delivery of some supporting infrastructure / developer contributions towards existing services and facilities
  • Developments on edge of town relatively remote from existing services and facilities
  • Some additional pressure on existing services and facilities

6, 7

A relatively low amount of additional development to Market Harborough. Likely to be dealt with by the identification of 1 or more key allocations:

  • East of Blackberry Grange
  • West of Farndon Fields
  • Scale of potential key sites will allow for delivery of some supporting infrastructure / developer contributions towards existing services and facilities
  • Less additional pressure on existing services and facilities (compared with options 2,3,1,4,5 above)
  • Developments on edge of town relatively remote from existing services and facilities

8, 9

Effectively no development at Market Harborough in addition to that already planned.

  • Allows the town to accommodate growth already planned (including the NW Market Harborough SDA)
  • No additional pressure on existing services and facilities
  • No developer contributions for new or improved infrastructure, services or facilities

View Comments (4) Employment

189. In addition to employment sites proposed for retention and protection by policy (Appendix F) and outstanding planning approvals for employment (Appendix E) in Market Harborough, all 9 options would see 10ha of new employment provision in Market Harborough to strengthen its established role as the primary economic centre of the District. This employment land would be allocated in the new Local Plan and potential sites under consideration include; Land at Airfield Farm, Land adjacent to Bowden Business Village. Remaining un-developed land at previously allocated employment sites would also be re-allocated for employment use in the new Local Plan including land at; Airfield Business Park, Compass Point Business Park and Peaker Park.

Employment Option/s

What does this mean for Market Harborough

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

1- 9

  • Development of 10ha of new employment land
  • Increased choices for businesses to expand / relocate and /or for new business to establish in the town
  • Focuses jobs in the main economic centre and most accessible location by sustainable modes of transport
  • Takes advantage of Market Harborough's establish role in the market and the catalyst of the Harborough Innovation Centre
  • Provides jobs in the town could discourage out-commuting
  • Potential sites relatively remote from town centre / services / facilities
  • Impact on A6 and local roads
  • Provision concentrated at 1 / few sites increasing risk of non delivery

No Comments Lutterworth

190. With a population of 9,353 (Census 2011) Lutterworth is the second largest settlement in the District. It is an historic market town located just off Junction 20 of the M1 with easy access to the M6 and A5 also. Its designation as a Key Centre is in recognition of its wide range of shops, employment, services and facilities which serve not only local residents but the wider rural catchment area.

No Comments Housing

191. The number of households in Lutterworth increased from 3,459 to 3,940 from 2001-2011 (ONS, Census). As of 31st March 2015 total completions 2011-2015 and outstanding planning approvals (commitments) stood at 336 dwellings. Once these completions and commitments are taken into account, the 9 options result in a remaining housing requirement for Lutterworth ranging from 257 - 2,238 dwellings. The options around the upper end of the range take into account the submission of a possible strategic development area to the east of the M1, which could potentially deliver approximately 1,950 dwellings, the viability of which is still being assessed. The draft Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (July 2015) has identified potential housing land for 442 dwellings (excluding the potential strategic development area).

192. The chart below shows the potential requirement to 2031 under each distribution option and the table outlines the potential impacts of the options on Lutterworth.

Lutterworth

Option 1:
RURAL

Option 2:
CORE STRATEGY DISTRIBUTION

Option 3:
URBAN

Option 4:
SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA

Option 5: KIBWORTH SDA

Option 6: LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 7: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

Option 8: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 9: LUTTERWORTH SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

388

506

645

398

375

2238

257

2098

2063

Option/s

What does this mean for Lutterworth?

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

6, 8, 9

Development of 1,950 dwellings and supporting infrastructure to the north and east of Lutterworth (largely in Misterton with Walcote parish).

  • Delivery of a relief-road to east of M1
  • Scale of development will allow delivery supporting infrastructure (i.e. primary school, convenience store, etc.)
  • Provision of accessible green infrastructure, cycle routes and footpaths
  • Less through traffic in town centre will allow for environmental improvements and attract a wider range of retailers
  • Improved air quality in town centre
  • Reduce pressure for development around Lutterworth and in Separation Area
  • Delivers employment land alongside housing and infrastructure development
  • Impact on existing Misterton community and maintaining separation
  • Local landscape impact
  • Viability of the strategic development area as yet unproven
  • Protection of Misterton Marshes SSSI
  • Some of site is in Flood Zone 3
  • Adequate connectivity with Lutterworth for higher order services
  • Capacity of services and facilities in Lutterworth (e.g. health, secondary education, etc.)
  • Impacts on the M1 and local roads
  • Some development likely to north of Lutterworth on Leicester Road to link proposed relief road to A426.

1, 4, 5, 7

Development on SHLAA sites identified in and adjacent to Lutterworth. Delivery of these options would need the potential allocation of the following key site:

  • Land east of Leicester Road (subject to Highway Authority comments)
  • Growth more gradual
  • Housing spread over a number of sites reducing risk of non delivery
  • Relief-road not delivered and benefits not realised
  • Incremental impact on services and facilities may not deliver major new infrastructure
  • Pressure for development in Separation Area between Lutterworth, Bitteswell and Magna Park
  • Sites become more remote from town centre / services / facilities

2, 3

The SHLAA has not identified capacity to accommodate the numbers identified in these options. However, the following key allocation couldcontribute towards meeting the requirement:

  • Land East of Leicester Road (subject to Highway Authority comments)

Other windfall sites may come forward over the plan period.

  • Development likely to be across a number of sites. Scale of supporting infrastructure / developer contributions delivered would be more limited
  • Impact on landscape may be less than SDA option
  • Preserves separation with Misterton
  • Relief-road not delivered and benefits not realised
  • Incremental impact on services and facilities may not deliver major new infrastructure
  • Pressure for development in Separation Area between Lutterworth, Bitteswell and Magna Park may increase
  • Sites become more remote from town centre / services / facilities

View Comments (1) Employment

193. In addition to employment sites proposed for retention and protection (Appendix F) and outstanding planning approvals for employment (Appendix E) for Lutterworth, options 1-5 and 7 of the new Local Plan would identify 1 or more strategic employment sites for the town totalling 4hectares to consolidate its secondary economic role. Potential sites under consideration include; Land South of Lutterworth Road (Harborough Employment Land Availability Assessment 2012 ref E/005LT/11), Land South of Lutterworth Road / Coventry Road (re E/001LT/11). Under options 6, 8 and 9 the new Local Plan will identify 1 or more strategic employment sites within the potential Lutterworth Strategic Development Area (see Figure 27 Appendix B) totalling 10ha, with no other allocation elsewhere in the town.

194. A summary of employment options for Lutterworth is provided in the table below.

Employment Option/s

What does this mean for Lutterworth?

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

1 - 5, 7

Allow for the development of 4ha of employment land to 2031at the following potential allocations:

  • Land south of Lutterworth Road (E/005LT/11)
  • Land south of Lutterworth Road / Coventry Road (E/001LT/11)
  • Increases choices for businesses to expand/relocate and/or for new business to establish in the town
  • Provides jobs in the town which could discourage out-commuting

6, 8, 9

Development of approximately 10ha of employment land as part of the strategic development area to the north and east of Lutterworth (adjacent to the M1)

  • Supports existing businesses in relocating and/or expanding and new businesses wanting to move into Lutterworth
  • Takes advantage of Lutterworth's location in relation to the strategic transport network
  • Helps to build a sustainable community providing jobs alongside new homes
  • Some existing employers in Lutterworth may move to new premises east of Lutterworth - reducing pollution and other impacts of HGV movements on the town centre. Releasing sites for housing
  • Takes advantage of potential new relief road
  • Effect of traffic movements on strategic highway network
  • Effect on SSSI and landscape
  • Delivery of employment land solely related to implementation and phasing of SDA (potentially more long term)
  • Site/s potentially more remote from town centre / services / facilities compared to any potential site under option 1-5 and 7

195. In addition the new Local Plan will set policy for strategic distribution, located close to Lutterworth. The 3 alternatives under consideration (set out in Section 9) are common to Options 1-9 for housing and employment (set out in Section 5) and would result in development of between 37 - 220ha. Option A at the lower end is based on the current strategy of no further phase of development but would allow limited new land for gradual growth. Both other options (B and C) allow for a third significant phase of development at different scales. It is considered that the effect of either Strategic Distribution Options B and C in combination with Options 6 or 8 for an potential SDA would be likely to have greatest impact for Lutterworth.

Strategic Distribution Option/s

What does this mean for Lutterworth?

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

A

Define site footprint to add 37ha for gradual new development.

  • Supports gradual growth and potentially existing company/s wanting to renew / expand operations on-site
  • Limited impact on Lutterworth / Bitteswell / Magna Park Area of Separation
  • Provides jobs near to Lutterworth could discourage out-commuting
  • Effect of traffic movements on local and strategic highway network including Bitteswell and Lutterworth town centre
  • Effect on local landscape

B

Allow for a third phase of development totalling 89ha

  • Contributes to meeting wider need for strategic warehousing in Leicester and Leicestershire
  • Provides jobs near to Lutterworth could discourage out-commuting
  • Effect of traffic movements on local and strategic highway network
  • Could exacerbate levels of in-commuting, if lack of labour-supply locally
  • Greater effect on local landscape
  • Effect on Lutterworth Air Quality Management Area (AQMA), and generation of noise and light pollution

C

Allow for a third phase of development totalling 220ha

  • Potential to attract new national / global companies to the area, heighten town profile
  • Could deliver new facilities for the town (e.g. Technical Academy)
  • Effect of traffic movements on local and strategic highway network, including capacity of M1(Junction 20)
  • Could exacerbate levels of in-commuting, or increase pressure for a higher level of housing growth to address any lack of labour-supply
  • Effect on Lutterworth AQMA, and generation of noise and light pollution
  • Effect on Bittesby Scheduled Monument and Bittesby House

No Comments Broughton Astley

196. Broughton Astley is the third largest settlement in the District with a population of 8,940 (Census 2011). Its relatively close proximity to the Leicester built up area has resulted in considerable development over the past 40 years. Although the village has all the key services, their capacity and the provision of additional services and facilities in the village has failed to keep pace with housing and population growth. Building on the Core Strategy policy context, the Broughton Astley Neighbourhood Plan (2014) sets out allocations for housing, employment, retail, leisure and medical facilities, many of which now have planning permission. However, these have yet to be delivered and benefit local residents. Broughton Astley's designation as a Key Centre is in recognition of current and planned improvements to local services and facilities.

View Comments (1) Housing

197. The number of households in Broughton Astley increased from 3,149 to 3,422 from 2001-2011 (ONS, Census). In terms of housing growth, the Neighbourhood Plan allocated land for 528 dwellings across 3 sites, well in excess of the minimum housing requirement figure set out in the Core Strategy. As of 31st March 2015 total completions 2011-2015 and outstanding planning approvals (commitments) stood at 605 dwellings. This figure includes the Neighbourhood Plan allocations, 2 of which have planning permission and 1 which has planning consent pending s106 Agreement. The draft Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (July 2015) has identified potential housing land for 1,710 dwellings.

198. In light of the 605 dwelling completions and planning permissions, Broughton Astley is not required to provide any further housing land under any the 9 options set out in Section 5. This means that, as the options currently stand, there is no need to identify additional land in the village to accommodate housing up to 2031 (either in the new Local Plan or through the Neighbourhood Plan).

No Comments Employment

199. Outstanding planning approvals for employment (commitments) are detailed in Appendix E. No new potential employment land for Broughton Astley is identified under the 9 options. The Neighbourhood Plan already gives protection to the Swannington Road/Stanier Road Industrial Estate as a retained and protected employment site for the village and allocates 2 areas for new employment development; land north of Broughton Way (1.7ha) and land to the north side of Broughton Way (planning consent for 1.25ha of employment development).

View Comments (1) Billesdon

200. With a population of 901 (Census 2011) Billesdon is one of the smaller Rural Centres. Located just of the A47, it is an historic village much of which is a designated Conservation Area. It has 5 out of 6 key services and a scheduled bus service into Leicester. The village has a neighbourhood plan which was 'made' in 2014 which forms part of the development plan for the District.

View Comments (3) Housing

201. The number of households in Billesdon increased from 355 to 420 from 2001-2011 (ONS, Census). As of 31st March 2015 total completions 2011-2015 and outstanding planning approvals (commitments) stood at 75 dwellings. Once these completions and commitments (including the housing allocations in the Neighbourhood Plan) are taken into account, the 9 options result in a remaining housing requirement for Billesdon ranging from 0 - 59 dwellings. The upper end of the range represents the rural focused distribution option. The draft Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (July 2015) has identified potential housing land for 344 dwellings. The chart below shows the potential requirement to 2031 under each distribution option and the table outlines the potential impacts of the options on Billesdon.

Billesdon

Option 1:
RURAL

Option 2:
CORE STRATEGY DISTRIBUTION

Option 3:
URBAN

Option 4:
SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA

Option 5: KIBWORTH SDA

Option 6: LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 7: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

Option 8: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 9: LUTTERWORTH SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

59

31

0

19

17

8

6

0

0

Housing Option/s

What does this mean for Billesdon?

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

3, 6, 7, 8, 9

No additional development proposed or very low levels of additional development which could be met through small site development if necessary. Neighbourhood Plan provision for 45 dwellings is a minimum so further development of this low scale would reflect this.

  • Shows that provision in the Neighbourhood Plan is still appropriate
  • Helps to protect village character
  • Unlikely to deliver new or enhancements to existing infrastructure, services and facilities

1, 2, 4, 5

Moderate to high level of additional proposed housing in addition to Neighbourhood Plan allocations.

  • Helps support village services and facilities
  • Delivers further housing to meet locally identified needs
  • Some developer contributions
  • Community may feel that the Neighbourhood Plan needs updating
  • Threat to village character

View Comments (1) Employment

202. No new employment land is identified under the 9 options as the Billesdon Neighbourhood Plan already allocates 1.5 hectares of land for business development. This will help to balance jobs with the planned level of housing growth.

View Comments (1) Fleckney

203. With a population of 4,894 (Census 2011) Fleckney is one of the largest Rural Centres in the District. It has a good range of services and facilities, having all 6 key services (although the future of the library is under discussion) and scheduled bus services to Market Harborough and Leicester. It also benefits from a reasonable range of employment opportunities within the village.

View Comments (1) Housing

204. The number of households in Fleckney increased from 1,788 to 1948 from 2001-2011 (ONS, Census). As of 31st March 2015 total completions 2011-2015 and outstanding planning approvals (commitments) stood at 34 dwellings. Once these completions and commitments are taken into account, the 9 options result in a remaining housing requirement for Fleckney ranging from 147 - 572 dwellings. The options reflect the fact that in relation to its size Fleckney has seen relatively low levels of completions and commitments over the past 5 years when compared to other large Rural Centres (i.e. the Kibworths and Great Glen). The draft Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (July 2015) has identified potential housing land for 708 dwellings. The chart below shows the potential housing requirement to 2031 under each distribution option and the table outlines the potential impacts of the options on Fleckney.

Fleckney

Option 1:
RURAL

Option 2:
CORE STRATEGY DISTRIBUTION

Option 3:
URBAN

Option 4:
SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA

Option 5: KIBWORTH SDA

Option 6: LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 7: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

Option 8: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 9: LUTTERWORTH SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

572

440

204

385

370

307

283

185

147

Housing Option/s

What does this mean for Fleckney?

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7

Relatively high levels of potential housing development when compared to recent level of completions. Delivery of these options would need the potential allocation of the following key sites:

  • Kilby Road
  • Arnesby Road
  • Scale of potential key sites will allow for delivery of some supporting infrastructure / developer contributions towards existingservices and facilities
  • Provide a range of housing to meet local housing need
  • Provision of additional green infrastructure
  • May provide scope to improve traffic in village centre
  • Possible improvements to village centre as a result of increase in population
  • Minimises impact on separation with Saddington
  • Avoids areas of flood risk
  • Impacts of development on local road network, particularly through the village centre
  • Impact on local services and facilities (primary school provision, GP services etc)
  • Some impact on relatively sensitive local landscape

3, 8, 9

Moderate levels of housing development with delivery through the potential allocation of one of the following key sites:

  • Kilby Road; or
  • Arnesby Road
  • Some developer contributions for community infrastructure but less than in Options 1,2,4,5,6 and 7
  • Homes provided to meeting local housing need
  • Minimises impact on separation with Saddington
  • Avoids areas of flood risk
  • Impacts of development on local road network
  • Capacity of local services to accommodate growth
  • May be some impact on relatively sensitive local landscape

No Comments Employment

205. In addition to 2 employment sites proposed for retention and protection (Churchill Way Industrial Estate and Victoria Works, Saddington Road) all options propose the allocation of 3 hectares of employment land in Fleckney to support its role as a Rural Centre and its potentially high level of housing growth. The only potential site under consideration is Land off Marlborough Way (Harborough Employment Land Availability Assessment 2012 ref E/001RC/11) which would form a logical extension to an employment site proposed for retention and protection.

Employment Option/s

What does this mean for Fleckney?

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

All Options

Protection of current employment sites proposed for retention and protection and the delivery of 3 hectares of employment land through the allocation of the following site:

  • Land off Marlborough Way (E/001RC/11)
  • Providing new employment opportunities alongside new homes to support local business
  • Reducing the need to commute
  • Safeguards the only main site currently in employment use for employment purposes
  • Adds to choice of employment sites across the District
  • Helps to support local services / facilities and settlement viability.
  • Transport implications of employment uses on local road network
  • Focusses all employment land in 1 location, limiting choice at the settlement level

View Comments (1) Great Glen

206. With a population of 3,662 (Census 2011), Great Glen is one of the larger Rural Centres in the District. It has all 6 key services and scheduled bus services to Leicester and Market Harborough. Its close proximity to the Leicester urban area means that residents have access to a wide range of employment opportunities and further services and facilities. Great Glen Parish Council is leading on the preparation of a neighbourhood plan for the parish.

View Comments (2) Housing

207. The number of households in Great Glen increased from 1,354 to 1,523 from 2001-2011 (ONS, Census). As of 31st March 2015, total completions 2011-2015 and outstanding planning approvals (commitments) stood at 321 dwellings. Once these completions and commitments are taken into account, the 9 options result in a remaining housing requirement for Great Glen ranging from 0 - 166 dwellings. The option at the upper end of the range is the rural focused distribution and those at the lower end reflect the development of 1 or more strategic development areas or urban focused distribution. The figures take into account the relatively high number of completions and commitments that have taken place in Great Glen since the 2001 Local Plan allocation at Stretton Road came forward. The draft Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (July 2015) has identified potential housing land for 1,619 dwellings (some of which is on the edge of Oadby).

208. The chart below shows the potential requirement to 2031 under each distribution option and the table outlines the potential impacts of the options on Great Glen.

Great Glen

Option 1:
RURAL

Option 2:
CORE STRATEGY DISTRIBUTION

Option 3:
URBAN

Option 4:
SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA

Option 5: KIBWORTH SDA

Option 6: LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 7: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

Option 8: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 9: LUTTERWORTH SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

166

64

0

25

17

0

0

0

0

Housing Option/s

What does this mean for Great Glen?

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

1, 2

Delivery of these options will be through development on SHLAA sites in and adjacent to Great Glen, the identification of which will be through the neighbourhood plan. It is not proposed to identify any key strategic allocations in the new Local Plan.

  • Delivery of some supporting infrastructure / developer contributions towards existing services and facilities
  • Allows for more gradual growth than over past few years
  • Reduced threat of coalescence with Oadby
  • Provides some housing in a sustainable location on the edge of Leicester
  • Impact on local landscape
  • Areas of flood risk, and increasing flood risk, would need be avoided
  • Possible impact on heritage assets

3 - 9

No or low additional housing requirement to 2031. Low housing figures could be accommodated through windfall (or unplanned) sites to 2031.

  • Allows village to adapt to relatively high rates of past building and outstanding planning permissions
  • Minimal impact on separation with Oadby
  • Village character protected
  • Little increased pressure on local community facilities / services
  • No or few developer contributions in medium / long term
  • Local housing needs may not be met

No Comments Employment

209. No suitable potential employment sites have been put forward in the settlement. Consequently, and due to its proximity and access to Leicester and its employment opportunities, the new Local Plan is not intending to identify any employment allocations at Great Glen.

View Comments (1) Houghton on the Hill

210. Houghton on the Hill is located on the A47 close to Leicester and has a population of 1,524 (Census 2011). With 4 out of 6 key services and a scheduled bus service to Leicester and Uppingham it is identified as a Rural Centre. The centre of the village lies to the south of the A47 and has Conservation Area status. Much of the land adjacent to the south east of the village is also included in the Conservation Area owing to its importance to the setting of the village. The parish council is leading on the preparation of a neighbourhood plan.

View Comments (4) Housing

211. The number of households in Houghton on the Hill increased from 601 to 622 from 2001-2011 (ONS, Census). As of 31st March 2015 total completions 2011-2015 and outstanding planning approvals (commitments) stood at 22 dwellings. This relatively low level of completions and commitments reflects the fact that Houghton on the Hill was not identified as a Rural Centre in the Core Strategy and therefore has not been the focus for rural development over the past 5 years. Once these completions and commitments are taken into account, the 9 options result in a remaining housing requirement for Houghton on the Hill ranging from 41 - 172 dwellings. The upper end of the range reflects the rural focused distribution of housing whilst the lower figures reflect more urban focused distributions, including the delivery of one or more strategic development areas. The draft Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (July 2015) has identified potential housing land for 356 dwellings in and adjacent to the village.

212. The chart below shows the potential requirement to 2031 under each distribution option and the table outlines the potential impacts of the options on Houghton on the Hill.

Houghton on the Hill

Option 1:
RURAL

Option 2:
CORE STRATEGY DISTRIBUTION

Option 3:
URBAN

Option 4:
SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA

Option 5: KIBWORTH SDA

Option 6: LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 7: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

Option 8: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 9: LUTTERWORTH SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

172

130

57

112

108

89

81

52

41

Housing Option/s

What does this mean for Houghton on the Hill?

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

1, 2, 4, 5

High levels of housing development on SHLAA sites identified in and adjacent to the village. The identification of housing sites is likely to be done through the neighbourhood planning process.

  • Delivery of some supporting infrastructure / developer contributions towards existing services and facilities
  • May allow for delivery of traffic calming measures/safe crossing, improving connectivity of village
  • Specific local housing needs could be met
  • Range of sites allowing for impact on heritage assets to be minimised
  • Possible impact of high level of growth on sensitive landscape setting
  • Impact of A47 on village cohesiveness and safety of residents
  • Connection of potential new development to north of A47 to the rest of the village to the south of A47
  • Potential impact of new development on the Conservation Area and heritage assets
  • Capacity of village services and facilities to accommodate high levels of growth

3, 6, 7, 8, 9

Low to moderate levels of housing development, similar to levels experienced over the past few years, on SHLAA sites in and adjacent to the village. The identification of housing site/s is likely to be done through the neighbourhood planning process.

  • Lower levels of developer contributions towards existing local services and facilities
  • Possible impacts on landscape and heritage assets likely to be less than high development options
  • Specific local housing needs could be met
  • Sites could impact on sensitive landscape setting
  • Impact on village Conservation Area and heritage assets
  • Level of developer contributions unlikely to deliver improvements to A47 safety and improvements to connectivity

No Comments Employment

213. No potential employment sites have been put forward in the settlement. Consequently, the new Local Plan is not intending to identify potential employment allocations in Houghton on the Hill, with provision proposed elsewhere being sufficient to meet the needs of the District.

View Comments (1) Husbands Bosworth

214. With a population of 1,145 (Census 2011) Husbands Bosworth is the one of the smallest Rural Centres in the District. It sits astride the A4304 and A5199 and benefits from a scheduled bus service to Market Harborough and Lutterworth. In terms of service provision it has 4 of the 6 key services. Much of the village is a designated Conservation Area.

No Comments Housing

215. The number of households in Husbands Bosworth increased from 392 to 464 from 2001-2011 (ONS, Census). As of 31st March 2015 total completions 2011-2015 and outstanding planning approvals (commitments) stood at 47 dwellings. Once these completions and commitments are taken into account the 9 options result in a remaining housing requirement for Husbands Bosworth ranging from 16 - 99 dwellings. The upper end of the range represents the rural focused distribution. The urban focused option and the options relying on the delivery of one or more strategic development areas give lower housing requirement figures for the village. The draft Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (July 2015) has identified potential housing land for 51 dwellings.

216. The chart below shows the potential housing requirement to 2031 under each distribution option and the table outlines the potential impacts of the options on Husbands Bosworth.

Husbands Bosworth

Option 1:
RURAL

Option 2:
CORE STRATEGY DISTRIBUTION

Option 3:
URBAN

Option 4:
SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA

Option 5: KIBWORTH SDA

Option 6: LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 7: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

Option 8: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 9: LUTTERWORTH SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

99

68

20

55

52

40

36

21

16

Housing Option/s

What does this mean for Husbands Bosworth?

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

1, 2, 4, 5

Moderate to high amount of housing development. Although the SHLAA has not identified sufficient capacity to accommodate these higher options, further additional windfall sites may come forward during the plan period.

  • Delivery of supporting infrastructure / developer contributions towards existing or improved services and facilities
  • Scale of development likely to support viability of local services
  • Specific local housing needs could be met
  • May contribute to improved traffic calming measures
  • Impact on local landscape
  • Development has the potential to impact on the Conservation Area and heritage assets
  • Capacity of local services (school site is constrained, GP services currently at capacity)

3, 6, 7, 8, 9

Relatively low levels of development through development of SHLAA sites or small windfall sites through plan period.

  • Less impact on constrained local services
  • Allows village to adjust to relatively high levels of development over past few years
  • Impacts on Conservation Area and heritage assets reduced
  • Impact on landscape reduced
  • Low levels of developer contributions/ supporting infrastructure delivered in village

No Comments Employment

217. There is a small amount of land in employment use in Husbands Bosworth parish. This lies outside the main village and the site, part of the Gliding Club, is proposed as an employment site to be retained and protected (Appendix F). There is one outstanding employment commitment detailed in Appendix E but no potential employment sites have been put forward in the settlement. Consequently, the new Local Plan is not intending to identify potential employment allocations in the village.

View Comments (2) The Kibworths

218. With a population of 5,433 (Census 2011), the Kibworths (Kibworth Beauchamp and Kibworth Harcourt) are the largest Rural Centre. As a single settlement, the Kibworths have a good range of services, facilities and shops along with some employment opportunities. The majority of the services and retail provision is located within Kibworth Beauchamp. Residents benefit from scheduled bus services to Leicester and Market Harborough. Both parish centres have Conservation Area status. The busy A6 cuts through the Kibworths along with the Midland Mainline train line. The preparation of a joint neighbourhood plan for the 2 parishes is underway.

View Comments (2) Housing

219. The number of households in the Kibworths increased from 1,953 to 2,284 from 2001-2011 (ONS, Census). As of 31st March 2015 total completions 2011-2015 and outstanding planning approvals (commitments) stood at 524 dwellings. Once these completions and commitments are taken into account, the 9 options result in a remaining housing requirement for the Kibworths ranging from 0 - 1,200 dwellings. The higher options (1,200 dwellings) take into account the submission of proposals relating to 2 potential strategic development areas in the Kibworths (one to the north and west and one to the north and east). The viability of these proposals is still being assessed. The draft Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (July 2015) has identified potential housing land for 1,695 dwellings (excluding the potential strategic development areas).

220. The chart below shows the potential requirement to 2031 under each distribution option and the table outlines the potential impacts of the options on the Kibworths.

The Kibworths

Option 1:
RURAL

Option 2:
CORE STRATEGY DISTRIBUTION

Option 3:
URBAN

Option 4:
SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA

Option 5: KIBWORTH SDA

Option 6: LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 7: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

Option 8: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 9: LUTTERWORTH SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

208

56

0

0

1200

0

1200

0

1200

Housing Option/s

What does this mean for the Kibworths?

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

5, 7, 9

The delivery of a strategic development area of approximately 1,200 dwellings and associated infrastructure in and adjacent to the Kibworths. The alternative sites put forward are:

  • Land north and east of Kibworth Harcourt; or
  • Land north and west of the Kibworths
  • Land north of Kibworth Harcourt has potential to deliver A6 relief route, making movement around the settlement easier and safer
  • Land to west of the Kibworths has potential to deliver a new road link from Saddington Road to A6
  • Delivery of wide choice of housing including accommodation to meet any specific local needs
  • Scale of development will allow delivery supporting infrastructure (local services and employment)
  • Removal of A6 traffic and its impacts from the centre of the village will benefit community and environment
  • Benefits for existing commercial/retail area leading to more choice potentially
  • Protects village character by removing traffic
  • Delivers employment alongside housing resulting in sustainability benefits
  • Provision of further green infrastructure for settlement
  • Possible impact on sensitive landscape areas
  • Impacts on existing communities of building housing on this scale
  • Benefits of link road to west of the Kibworths may not be substantial
  • Viability of strategic development areas not yet proven
  • Impact on capacity of existing services and facilities (health, secondary education, etc)
  • Change in character of the Kibworths as a whole given scale of development
  • Impact on Conservation Areas/listed buildings

1, 2

Low to moderate amounts of additional housing. Delivery would be through development of sites identified in the SHLAA and could be identified through the neighbourhood planning process.

  • Allows for some limited further growth to support local housing needs
  • Some developer contributions would be forthcoming to support community facilities
  • Supports development of local services and facilities whist recognising the amount of growth that has already been accommodated at the Kibworths
  • Limits exacerbation of transport/movement issues around the Kibworths
  • No realistic prospect of delivery of a bypass
  • Lack of developer contributions to deliver large community facilities
  • May not meet local housing needs
  • Affordability pressures may increase

3, 4, 6, 8

Effectively no additional housing development at the Kibworths in addition to that already planned.

  • Allows village to accommodate growth already planned
  • No additional pressure on existing services and facilities
  • Protects village character from erosion
  • No developer contributions for new or improved infrastructure, services or facilities
  • No realistic prospect of delivery of a bypass

No Comments Employment

221. In addition to the 3 employment areas proposed to be retained and protected (Appendix F) and an outstanding employment commitment for the Kibworths detailed in Appendix E, options 5, 7 and 9 would identify 1 or more strategic employment sites of approximately 5 hectares in the Kibworths within one of the alternative potential Strategic Development Areas. The other options do not deliver any additional employment land allocations in the Kibworths. A summary of employment options for the Kibworths is provided below.

Employment Option/s

What does this mean for the Kibworths?

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

5, 7, 9

Delivery of up to 10 hectares of new employment land as part of any new strategic development area.

  • Improved range of employment opportunities in the village
  • Balance between new home and jobs, reducing the need to travel
  • Increased choices for businesses to establish, grow and relocate within the settlement
  • Increased in-commuting to village
  • Effect of increased traffic on local roads unless well located in relation to new relief or link road
  • Delivery of employment land solely linked to implementation and phasing of SDA (may come later than housing)
  • Effect on sensitive landscapes
  • More limited commercial market in settlement - higher risk in terms of viability / deliverability

1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8

No employment land allocated in the village

  • No additional pressure on the local road network
  • May limit ability of businesses to stay in local area
  • Long term sustainability of the village as growing population relies on out commuting

View Comments (1) Ullesthorpe

222. With a population of 903 (Census 2011) Ullesthorpe is the second smallest Rural Centre in the District. It lies close to the western boundary of Harborough District, close to the A5. It has 4 of the 6 key services with a scheduled bus service to Lutterworth and Hinckley. Much of the village lying to the west of the west of the dismantled railway line is included in the designated Conservation Area.

View Comments (5) Housing

223. The number of households in Ullesthorpe increased from 341 to 395 from 2001-2011 (ONS, Census). As of 31st March 2015 total completions 2011-2015 and outstanding planning approvals (commitments) stood at 72 dwellings. Once these completions and commitments are taken into account, the 9 options result in a remaining housing requirement for Ullesthorpe ranging from 0 - 54 dwellings. The upper end of the range reflects the rural focused distribution option. The draft Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (July 2015) has identified potential housing land for 162 dwellings.

224. The chart below shows the potential requirement to 2031 under each distribution option and the table outlines the potential impacts of the options on Ullesthorpe.

Ullesthorpe

Option 1:
RURAL

Option 2:
CORE STRATEGY DISTRIBUTION

Option 3:
URBAN

Option 4:
SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA

Option 5: KIBWORTH SDA

Option 6: LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 7: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

Option 8: SCRAPTOFT/ THURNBY SDA AND LUTTERWORTH SDA

Option 9: LUTTERWORTH SDA AND KIBWORTH SDA

54

27

0

17

15

7

4

0

0

Housing Option/s

What does this mean for Ullesthorpe?

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

1, 2

Moderate levels of development. Delivery would be through the development of identified SHLAA sites in and adjacent to the village.

  • Delivery of supporting infrastructure / developer contributions towards existing or improved services and facilities
  • Scale of development likely to support viability of local shops and services
  • Pressure on separation with Claybrooke Parva
  • Potential impact of development on sensitive landscape areas
  • Impact on Conservation Area, heritage assets and dismantled railway line
  • Pressure on capacity of local primary school and GP surgery

3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

No or very low housing requirement to 2031 in addition to what is already planned. Delivery would be through suitable windfall sites over the plan period.

  • Limited, more gradual growth
  • Settlement would have time to adapt to relatively high level of building and outstanding permissions over past few years
  • Reduced pressure on local services and facilities
  • Reduced pressure on sensitive landscape and heritage assets
  • Ability to meet specific local housing needs may be an issue
  • Limited developer contributions for new or improved infrastructure, services or facilities

View Comments (1) Employment

225. No suitable potential employment sites have been put forward in the settlement. Consequently, and due to its proximity to Lutterworth and its employment opportunities, the new Local Plan is not intending to identify potential employment allocations in the village.

View Comments (10) Selected Rural Villages

226. Selected Rural Villages have been identified on the basis of the presence of at least 2 of the 6 key services (food shop, GP surgery, library, post office, primary school and pub). The following villages currently meet these criteria: Bitteswell, Church Langton, Claybrooke Magna, Dunton Bassett, Foxton, Gilmorton, Great Bowden, Great Easton, Hallaton, Lubenham, Medbourne, North Kilworth, South Kilworth, Swinford, Tilton and Tugby. These villages have fewer services than Rural Centres and are considered suitable for small-scale infill developments or limited extensions to help address economic, social or community objectives. Great Bowden is the largest of the Selected Rural Villages, with approximately 450 households. Gilmorton, Lubenham and Dunton Bassett all have over 300 households, whilst the smallest is Church Langton, with fewer than 100 households.

View Comments (9) Housing

227. For each Selected Rural Village, the table in Figure 23 sets out:

  • the number of households as at 2011;
  • the number of completions 2011-2015 combined with outstanding residential planning permissions as at 31st March 2015;
  • the range of housing required by the 9 distribution options; and
  • the number of houses that sites identified in the draft Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) 2015 could accommodate.

Selected Rural Village

Number of households at 2011

House completions (since 2011) and commitments as at 31st March 2015

Range of potential housing need to 2031 resulting from the 9 Options

Draft SHLAA 2015 capacity (dwellings)

Bitteswell

195

8

12 - 53

129

Church Langton

95

4

6 - 26

12

Claybrooke Magna

222

1

18 - 68

54

Dunton Bassett

321

6

24 - 94

43

Foxton

192

9

12 - 51

17

Gilmorton

385

30

17 - 91

111

Great Bowden

449

27

24 - 114

351

Great Easton

274

36

5 - 51

255

Hallaton

242

7

17 - 68

95

Lubenham

341

11

23 - 95

155

Medbourne

199

15

9 - 47

120

North Kilworth

245

30

6 - 47

145

South Kilworth

193

1

16 - 59

0

Swinford

227

4

17 - 67

89

Tilton

147

14

5 - 32

28

Tugby

136

9

7 - 34

9

Figure 23: Selected Rural Villages - Household population, range of residual housing requirements to 2031 and potential housing land capacity

228. The table below summarises how the Selected Rural Villages as a whole could be impacted by differing levels of housing development and the potential benefits and issues which could result from these levels of growth. The Settlement Profiles look at the opportunities and constraints of each Selected Rural Village in more detail.

Housing Option/s

What does this mean for the Selected Rural Villages

Potential Benefits

Potential Issues

3, 6, 7, 8, 9

These options see the lowest numbers in proportional terms going to the selected rural villages. Combined with completions (2011-2015) and outstanding commitments these options would result in selected rural villages growing generally by between 10% - 20% from 2011-31.

  • Allows for provision of homes to meet specific local housing needs (i.e. elderly, young)
  • Some developer contributions for community infrastructure and services
  • Sustains local services and facilities without putting them under undue pressure
  • Impacts on local landscape and settlement character minimised
  • Insufficient potential housing land identified in a handful of settlements. However, further 'windfall' sites are likely to come forward in these settlements over the plan period
  • Some villages have services and facilities with capacity constraints and the level of development may not be sufficient to increase capacity
  • Increase in local traffic and parking problems
  • Unlikely to lead to an improvement in services and facilities

1, 2, 4, 5

These 4 options result in higher housing numbers in proportional terms going to the selected rural villages to 2031.

Option 1 (Rural Focus distribution) sees the highest housing numbers going to the selected rural villages. Combined with completions and outstanding commitments, this option would result in selected rural villages growing on average by 31% from 2011-2031. Potential housing growth under the other options would be generally between 20% - 25% over the plan period.

  • Allows for greater provision of homes to meet specific local housing needs (i.e. elderly, young)
  • Provision of greater range of housing type and improved housing choice in the village
  • Population growth would sustain support local services and facilities
  • Increased amount of developer contributions for community infrastructure and services
  • Retain and attract younger population
  • Could result in measures to ameliorate the effects of traffic on villages where this is an issue
  • Increased number of settlements where insufficient potential housing land has come forward. Greater reliance on further 'windfall' sites coming forward in these settlements over the plan period
  • Impact on local landscape and possible impact on separation between settlements
  • Potential impact on settlement character as a result of higher growth
  • Pressure on local primary schools
  • Potential impact on heritage assets/Conservation Areas and their setting could be greater
  • Potential impacts on local traffic and parking issues could be greater

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